Seeding Change Fellows 2017

Welcome our 2017 Seeding Change Fellows!

Seeding Change is thrilled to welcome 30 young Asian American activists and organizers to be a part of the 4th cohort of the National Fellowship Program for Asian American Organizing and Civic Engagement.

Meet the fellows here.

The fellowship program aims to grow the next generation of organizers by developing the leadership and skills of young Asian Americans who want to organize for social change in low-income immigrant and refugee communities.

This year, our fellowship has grown, expanding to 15 host-sites and 13 cities, including Asian American Organizing Project, Asian Americans United, Asia Inc., Asian Pacific Environmental Network, CAAAV: Organizing Asian Communities, Chinese Progressive Association – Boston, Chinese Progressive Association – San Francisco, DRUM – South Asian Organizing Center, Filipino Advocates for Justice, Filipino Community Center, Khmer Girls in Action, Korean Resource Center, Pilipino Workers Center of Southern California, VietLead, and Southeast Asian Coalition.

Learn more about the sites here.

Next week, our fellows will be gathering in the Bay Area for their orientation retreat. They will then spend 7 to 10 weeks with their local sites all across the country — getting to know the local community and learning how grassroots communities organize, develop leadership, and build power to win. Fellows will work on key issues impacting grassroots immigrant communities, including: housing; worker’s rights; youth leadership development; climate justice; and civic engagement.


We are so excited to start building with this cohort of Asian American activists and organizers looking to to make change.

Fellows at the 2016 Graduation

Apply Today to be a 2017 Seeding Change Fellow — Due 2/12/17

Apply Today to be a 2017 Seeding Change Fellow

Fellows at the 2016 Graduation

We are now accepting applications for the 2017 National Fellowship Program for Asian American Organizing and Civic Engagement. Applications are due online on February 12, 2017 at 11:59 PM PST. Apply here.

About the Fellowship

The National Fellowship Program for Asian American Organizing and Civic Engagement is an intensive 10-12-week, full-time volunteer program that develops the leadership of a new generation of activists and organizers who are deeply invested in building the power of and improving the lives of working-class Asian immigrant communities.

Since its launch in 2014, the Seeding Change Fellowship has graduated 63 fellows. Fellows have gone on to become staff, volunteers and activists with their host sites or other organizations in the fellowship network.

Read more about the fellowship program.

The fellowship program will run from June 1 to August 17, 2017, with two start dates for the cohorts. Fellows will be placed with a community-based organization, where they will spend at least 8-10 weeks, working with the organization, immigrant leaders, and the local community. Fellows will have the opportunity to develop their skills from grassroots fundraising, outreach and education, organizing, and language skills. Fellows will also deepen understanding of community organizing and civic engagement. At the beginning of the program, fellows will also participate in a week-long training and orientation in the San Francisco Bay Area. The fellowship program closes with a week-long closing retreat in August.

Meet the 2017 Potential Host Sites.

Our host organizations are grassroots community-based organizations that are leading local and national work on a range of issues from workers rights, immigrant rights, youth organizing, gentrification and displacement. This year, we have nearly 20 host organizations that are rooted in Asian immigrant and refugee communities. Host organizations are located in California, the Midwest, Northeast, and North Carolina. They are working in Chinese, Khmer, Filipino, Hmong, Muslim, South Asian, Vietnamese communities.

Fellows support organizations by:

  • conducting outreach and education in public housing, transit corridors, and working class neighborhoods
  • developed curriculum and conducted workshops for high school youth
  • providing education and services to community members through workers and tenant rights community clinics
  • organizing community festivals and climate justice march and convenings
  • working directly with and alongside youth and adult leaders

Learn more about the fellowship by meeting our 2016 fellows and host sites.

For more information about the fellowship, visit: http://www.seeding-change.org/programs/fellowship/

Contact apply@seeding-change.org with any questions.

nyoti ad

SOUL 2016 National Youth Organizing Training Institute

Seeding Change is proud to co-sponsor the SOUL‘s 2016 National Youth Organizing Training Institute. Applications are due Friday, February 12, 2015.

SOUL Logo

West Coast: March 30, 31 & April 1 : Oakland, CA
Co-sponsored by: Arab Resource & Organizing Center, Chinese Progressive Association Youth MOJO, Coleman Advocates, Innercity Struggle & Seeding Change
To apply online: OAK individual application & OAK organizational application.
Apply by  2/12

East Coast Institute Applications coming soon!
Week of April 25-30 :: New York, NY

​​The INSTITUTE 2016, offered on both East & West Coasts, is an introductory organizing training for young organizers, young member leaders, and youth organizers from across the country.

Participants will come together to build their skills, exchange lessons learned, and strategize to fight and win justice for our communities. We’ll develop a solid and systematic orientation to the fundamentals of organizing, including base-building, campaign strategy, and leadership development. Rooted in current youth struggles, the INSTITUTE will provide a unique space for emerging leaders to engage with the challenges and opportunities of the current moment, to advance our organizations and to build a stronger movement.

Participants will receive SOUL’s youth organizing curriculum manual, as well as breakfast and lunch for all days of training. Training fees range from $200 to $690, and are determined on a sliding scale based on organizational budget. The training fee does not cover lodging expenses. The training fee does not cover lodging expenses.

Space for THE INSTITUTES is limited, so please do apply early!

:: Application Instructions ::

This application has two parts.

ORGANIZATIONAL APPLICATION. Organizational staff should complete this part of the application. Only one application per organization is required.

INDIVIDUAL APPLICATION. Each person who is applying to attend the National Youth Organizing Training Institute must complete this individual application.

Each application can be submitted separately, but BOTH applications must be submitted online by the due date in order to be considered.

Oakland Institute application deadline is February 12, 2015.
NEW YORK INSTITUTE week of April 25 :: Applications coming soon!

To apply online: OAK individual application & OAK organizational application.

For more information, assistance, or to discuss your application with us, please please call (510)451-5466 x217 or email SOUL at nyoti@schoolofunityandliberation.org.

 

 

SCF Graduation Fellows

Apply today to be a 2016 Seeding Change Fellow! Due Feb 12!

Apply Today

We are now accepting applications for the 2016 National Fellowship Program for Asian American Organizing and Civic Engagement. Applications are due online on February 12, 2016. Apply here.

About the Fellowship

The National Fellowship Program for Asian American Organizing and Civic Engagement is an intensive 10-week, full-time volunteer program that develops the leadership of a new generation of activists and organizers who are deeply invested in building the power of and improving the lives of working-class Asian immigrant communities.

Over the last two years, the Seeding Change Fellowship has graduated 43 fellows. Fellows have gone on to become staff, volunteers and activists with their host sites or other organizations in the fellowship network.

Learn more about the 2016 Potential Host Sites.

The fellowship program will run from June to August 2016. Fellows will be placed with a community-based organization, where they will spend at least 10 weeks, working with the organization, immigrant leaders, and the local community. Fellows will have the opportunity to develop their skills from grassroots fundraising, outreach and education, organizing, and language skills. Fellows will also deepen understanding of community organizing and civic engagement. At the beginning of the program, fellows will also participate in a week-long training and orientation in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Read more about highlights from the fellowship.

Fellows support organizations by:

  • conducting outreach and education in public housing, transit corridors, and working class neighborhoods
  • developed curriculum and conducted workshops for high school youth
  • providing education and services to community members through workers and tenant rights community clinics
  • organizing community festivals and climate justice march and convenings
  • working directly with and alongside youth and adult leaders

Learn more about the 2015 fellows and host sites.

For more information about the fellowship, visit: http://www.seeding-change.org/programs/fellowship/

Contact linda “@” seeding-change.org with any questions.

 

justiceakaigurley (smallest)

#JusticeforAkaiGurley Selfie Action

Call out for Asians to Participate in #JusticeforAkaiGurley Selfie Action

As many of you know, ethnic and corporate mainstream media have responded to the indictment of NYPD Officer Peter Liang for the death of Akai Gurley by framing the indictment as dividing the Chinese community, and focused on calls to drop the indictment of Officer Liang. Furthermore, they are using issue to pit Asian and Black communities against one another.

CAAAV Organizing Asian Communities has been working closely with the family of Akai Gurley, community organizers in East New York, Brooklyn (where Gurley was visiting a friend) and other groups since the shooting happened late last year to show our solidarity and support. CAAAV and the family of Akai Gurley call for the accountability of ALL police officers who kill unarmed civilians. We know that we have support from Asian Diasporic communities, and in the last couple of weeks we have heard from our communities located in cities including the Bay Area, Boston, Chicago, Oregon and New York, showing solidarity with Akai Gurley’s family.

RIGHT NOW, it is critical for Asian American communities, especially Chinese, South & Southehast Asians, to move our communities in support of Black-led organizing against police brutality. We believe a strong turnout will send a powerful message.

Given this context, we are really hoping you will participate in the Justice for Akai Gurley Selfie Action to show your solidarity and that you stand with Akai Gurley’s family.

THREE easy steps to contribute to the #JusticeforAkaiGurley Selfie Action! We are accepting submissions on a rolling basis, but hoping to get massive numbers posted prior to April 24th!

1) TAKE A PHOTO OF YOURSELF HOLDING YOUR SIGN using #JusticeforAkaiGurley #holdALLcopsaccountable #BlackLivesMatter and your location (Seattle, Chicago, Bay, NYC, etc.) so we can show the Akai Gurley’s family that they have support from many places outside of CAAAV.

2) Write a short paragraph, text only, that begins with this prompt: “I am a ___________, (e.g. Korean American woman, Asian comrade, etc.) and I demand Justice for Akai Gurley because_____________.”

3) SHARE this action out on social media – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and SEND the photo and paragraph to caaavjustice@riseup.net.

Also! If you are having a meeting, event or action, please consider asking folks to take a selfie for #JusticeforAkaiGurley.

Here are some examples:

ag1 ag2 ag3 ag4

APIs4BlackLives have posted their selfies here.


Read more here:

Frequently Asked Questions:

Do I have to show my whole face in the photo?
No – whatever you are comfortable with. Wear a hat, glasses, cover part of your face, whatever you’d like.

Should my ‘because…’ text be separate from the sign I hold up in my photo?
Yes.  The sign you hold up in the photo should simply read “#JusticeforAkaiGurley”, “#holdALLcopsaccountable”, “BlackLivesMatter” and “Boston” or city/town you’re repping.  Then, whatever truth you share, you should send as text in the body of the email.

What if I have multiple identities that I would like to acknowledge?
You can definitely add to the truth prompt, for example, “I am a mixed race queer man, and an adoptee, and I demand Justice for Akai Gurley because…”

Will you accept photos/truth after the deadline?
Yes, this will be an ongoing project.  That being said, if you can possibly send me something by the deadline, that would help us out tons.  We’re trying to get this up and running before April 26th.

 

nyoti ad

SOUL 2015 National Youth Organizing Training Institute

Seeding Change is proud to co-sponsor the SOUL‘s 2015 National Youth Organizing Training Institute. Applications are due Friday, February 6, 2015.

SOUL Logo

West Coast: March 18, 19 & 20 : Oakland, CA
Co-sponsored by: CJJC, Coleman Advocates, Black Organizing Project & Seeding Change
To apply online: OAK individual application & OAK organizational application.
Apply by NEXT FRIDAY 2/6

​​The INSTITUTE 2015 is an introductory organizing training for young organizers, young member leaders, and youth organizers from across the country.

Participants will come together to build their skills, exchange lessons learned, and strategize to fight and win justice for our communities. We’ll develop a solid and systematic orientation to the fundamentals of organizing, including base-building, campaign strategy, and leadership development. Rooted in current youth struggles, the INSTITUTE will provide a unique space for emerging leaders to engage with the challenges and opportunities of the current moment, to advance our organizations and to build a stronger movement.

Participants will receive SOUL’s youth organizing curriculum manual, as well as breakfast and lunch for all days of training. Training fees range from $175 to $665, and are determined on a sliding scale based on organizational budget. The training fee does not cover lodging expenses. Lodging options in the area can range from $50-100 per night per person. Feel free to contact us if you have questions regarding accommodations.

Space for THE INSTITUTES is limited, so please do apply early!

:: Application Instructions ::

This application has two parts.

ORGANIZATIONAL APPLICATION. Organizational staff should complete this part of the application. Only one application per organization is required.

INDIVIDUAL APPLICATION. Each person who is applying to attend the National Youth Organizing Training Institute must complete this individual application.

Each application can be submitted separately, but BOTH applications must be submitted online by the due date in order to be considered.

Oakland Institute application deadline is February 6, 2015.

To apply online: OAK individual application & OAK organizational application.

For more information, assistance, or to discuss your application with us, please email SOULat nyoti@schoolofunityandliberation.org.

IMG_2600

Three Practices for Movement Builders for the New Year

Photo Caption: At the Black Lives Matter Story Time: Family Teach-In and March in Oakland organized by the Colorful Mamas for the 99%. (From right to left) Tomu, Cliff Hong, Olivia, Marie Choi, Collin, Mychi Nguyen, Kimi Lee, and Alex T. Tom.

This is also cross-posted on Movement Strategy Center’s Let’s Talk: At the Heart of Movement Building 

I usually don’t share a lot of personal stuff on Facebook but lately as a new parent I’ve been leaning into it and sharing more, and at times, even ‘over-sharing’ my thoughts and reflections. Folks who know me well know that I like to give self-care/self-love advice and human/relationship development advice. Sometimes it’s unsolicited; but I believe it can still be helpful. I think all this is crucial for a strong and resilient movement and community. As we get into the New Year, I wanted to offer three practices that have helped me through the years as an activist, organizer, and Executive Director (and a good partner and father too!).

We should all be reflective of what happened this past year — the ups and the down. We should take stock of what we appreciate and take time to detox from all the negative energy and toxicity. We are not immune to any of this since we (still) live in such an oppressive and unequal society. People — especially frontline organizers, service providers, healers, unity builders, movement builders take on a lot of society’s alienation, so need to take care of themselves while they are taking care of others. Every year, too, there is a lot of pain and loss; it is important to take this time to sit with things and remember the community we have that support and love us.

Here are my 3 suggested practices for movement builders:

#1 — Read (or re-read) “The Four Agreements” by Don Miguel Ruiz: This is by far the best and quickest read for me. It has helped me process and detox from the negativity around me. Negativity that comes in all forms. Whether it’s self-doubt, being too hard on yourself and others,  processing the pain and trauma of others, or letting anger and outrage overpower our love and compassion, we are all living in the same movement ecology and impact each other. The Four Agreements are very practical and help me everyday. They remind me to be compassionate and kind to myself, and others, even to not so kind people in my life.

The four agreements are basic:

  1. Be impeccable with your word.
  2. Don’t take anything personally.
  3. Don’t make assumptions.
  4. Always do your best.

(Note: You should still read the book. It’s so much deeper than this.)

#2 — Meet with yourself: This is my favorite. Movement builders have a lot of meetings and retreats to evaluate the year. Why don’t we develop a practice of scheduling 1-2 hour or day-long meetings with ourselves and do the same thing? Some people call it a “self retreat”. Every week, I try to set aside some time to meet with myself and do at least one self-retreat a year. If you decide to do weekly or monthly meetings with yourself, it should be a meeting you schedule well in advance that you don’t move or change unless an emergency comes up. Often times, since it is a meeting with yourself, you may feel like you can just reschedule to accommodate others. If people continue to ask what meeting you have that you can’t move, you can practice saying, “I have an important meeting with myself.” Of course, you should be flexible when needed; but if you have a pattern of always putting others before yourself, you can practice prioritizing meeting with yourself even if it is only an hour.

#3 — Meet with your partner and/or other people: After you meet with yourself, meet with your partner (however you define it) and/or other close friends to share your reflections of the year, priorities for the next year, then get feedback. Self-care/self-love is about collective care and love. This is dialectic and should be done simultaneously. For partners/couples, it’s a good time to celebrate moments throughout the year and talk about stressors in the relationship and hard topics like tensions, shared finances, and long term planning, for example. They too should meet with themselves before this retreat. You get the idea.

This year, I did my self-retreat for a few hours on New Year’s Eve. On New Year’s Day, Mychi, my partner, and I had a mini-brunch/retreat. This was actually our first “date” together, since we had our newborn, Collin, 3 months ago. We took pause and appreciated each other. We reviewed the year, which included looking at our calendars, pictures (mostly from our phones) and notes from our own reflections. In the midst of the challenging year, there were a lot of beautiful moments we forgot about besides having a beautiful child together. We also reflected that we are fortunate to have such an amazing community of chosen and non-chosen family and have deep gratitude for what we have in life.

Here are some of the reflection questions we use to reflect on personal life, paid work, and movement and community work:

  • What happened this year? What are some highlights, themes and takeaways for the year?
  • What triggers and stressors did we notice in ourselves?
  • What did I change the most? What did I change the least?
  • Where did I exercise the most and the least leadership?
  • What are our personal and collective priorities for next year?
  • What are practices we want to continue or develop?
  • What kind of support do we need from each other?

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I write this humbly and know there is no formula on how to do take care of ourselves. There are a lot of other resources and expertise, especially in the Bay Area, for self-care in the movement. These are just a few practices that have worked for me.

Many of my practices actually comes from OGs in the movement that I met at a weeklong silent meditation retreat in my early 20s. They said I was too young to be so “burnt out” already. One woman in particular told me she scheduled important meetings with herself at least every month and said I should do the same. You can do a lot of things during your retreat like going outdoors, meditating, reflecting, and writing. You can do this through your organization and/or collective. The most important thing is setting your intentions to actually create space in your life to make this a practice. Of course, some of this is easier said than done. In fact, it is hard sometimes to make time for this. But we also have agency and can make choices. Even if you did this once a year, it will have a tremendous impact on your life and others.

In particular, I encourage more cisgendered, hetero men, and men of color to dive deeper into this practice. Patriarchy and heterosexism also runs deep in the movement so we really need to make time for self-reflection and take care of our needs for ourselves and the movement. Overall, I hope this blog can help catalyze more conversations, more practices, and, yes, more meetings.

Finally, I want to acknowledge that there is a lot going on, and, like many of you, I’ve been totally inspired by the current moment and the new vibrant ‪#‎BlackLivesMatter and Black liberation movement that’s emerging in this country and world. I hope everyone gets a chance to soak it in, reflect, and replenish for yourself, your community and the movement. For our fierceness, courage, and collective liberation, we need to do this. I, too, will commit to do my best and will be my best self for the moment and beyond.

Happy 2015 and happy year of reflection and resistance!

Alex T. Tom is the Executive Director of the Chinese Progressive Association in San Francisco, the co-founder of Seeding Change – a Center for Asian American Movement Building, and a new father.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We Choose Resistance: Listen to the Call on Black & Asian Solidarity

Listen to the Call


Thank you for your interest in the We Choose Resistance: National Call on Black and Asian Solidarity. Thank you to our co-host Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter and our speakers Patrisse Marie Cullors-Brignac, Black Lives Matter; Scot Nakagawa, ChangeLab; Kabzuag Vaj, Southeast Asian Freedom Network and Freedom Inc.; Fahd Ahmed, DRUM – South Asian Organizing Center. Already, this call and this movement has sparked more conversations and actions across the country!

As you all listen to the call, we wanted to share a couple reflections. This growing movement has inspired and opened up space for new people to take action in support of Black liberation as central to our collective liberation. This is also historical. The Asian American movement and many of our grassroots organization were inspired by the Black liberation movement and do Black and Asian solidarity in our day-to-day work.

This is also an opportunity for us to examine how we show up for people who are invisibilized in our own community. As DRUM put out in their Questions to the Movement: “As we acknowledge black communities as a whole bearing the brunt of state violence, what members of our communities do we invisibilize due to multiple systems of oppression in our societies?” As Asian folks, we must ask ourselves: How do we show up for women, the poor, queer and transgendered folks? How do we show up for Arab and Muslim community and Southeast Asian communities who are primary targets of police and state violence in our own community? How do we show up and take the lead from folks in our own community? Showing up for Black Lives must also mean showing up for our own community.

Here are some of the next steps we want people to think about. This was put out on the call as well:

  1. ORGANIZE, ORGANIZE, ORGANIZE: Hold conversations and discussions at about anti-Black racism in your school, community and with your friends and family.
  2. DONATE to the Ferguson Legal Fund
  3. GET INVOLVED with a grassroots organization near you! We know that this is beyond just Mike Brown and Eric Warner – it is about indicting the entire system and how we do this solidarity work for the long haul. Here are some groups to consider around the country, Southeast Asian Freedom Network , CAAAV Organizing Asian Communities, Desis Rising Up and Moving!, Providence Youth Students Movement, Freedom Inc., 1Love Movement, VAYLA, Khmer Girls in Action, Mekong, and APEN
  4. SHOW UP and TAKE ACTION: It is important for Asian American communities to show up for Black Lives and take the lead from Black communities. This also means engaging, reaching out and taking initiative. Stay up to date here: http://fergusonaction.com/ As mentioned above, we should also use this moment to talk about how to show up for folks marginalized in our own community, especially the Arab and Muslim community and Southeast Asian communities who are primary targets of police and state violence in our own community.
  5. JOIN THE CONVERSATION: We know these are not easy conversations to have in our movement and community but they are necessary. After you listen to the call, please send us your reflections, questions, and feedback to inform our next call. Send us a Facebook message and or Email change@seeding-change.org

Some Guiding Questions for your conversations from DRUM, revised by ChangeLab

RESOURCES and LINKS

 

Photo Credit: Bay Area Solidarity

Black Lives Matter

We Choose Resistance: National Call on Black & Asian Solidarity

Listen to the Call


 

We invite you to be on a National Call on Black and Asian Solidarity co-hosted by Seeding Change and Black Lives Matter on Sunday, December 14th from 7-8 pm (PST) / 9-10 pm (CST) and 10-11 pm (EST).

What are the best ways for Asians to show up for Black communities in the current moment? How do we struggle with anti-Black racism in our own communities? Why is Black and Asian solidarity a strategic movement intervention? Speakers will include: ChangeLabSoutheast Asian Freedom Network – SEAFNDRUM – Desis Rising Up & Moving, and #BlackLivesMatter.

Check out these reflections and statements:

Please register and RSVP here: https://www.fuzemeeting.com/webinar/register/1044442

This will be a video conference call. For audio, there will be a call-in number. Please download FUZE onto your computer at: www.fuze.com

Call Hosts:
Seeding Change
www.seeding-change.org

#BlackLivesMatter
http://blacklivesmatter.tumblr.com/

Photo Credit: Freedom Inc, Madison WI

tumblr_nal60xtjNX1rw3xb4o1_500

Asian American Solidarity Statements and Articles in Support of #blacklivesmatter

With the grand jury non-indictment of the police killings of Mike Brown and Eric Garner, Asian Americans across the country have been on the streets expressing our solidarity and having the deep and necessary conversations in our community. From San Francisco/Bay Area, Los Angeles to Madison, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Providence and DC, Asian Americans have been showing up and busting up the “model minority,” which is used to maintain white supremacy, anti-blackness and capitalism. We need a Model Minority Mutiny. We compiled the statements and articles on Asian Americans in solidarity with #BlackLivesMatter as a resource and tool for activists and organizers.

Thank you to Ellen Choy and Christine Cordero for the suggestion to do this and helping us compile this list. We’ll keep this updated as much as possible. Please send us any statements or resources that we have missed. We plan to keep this up-to-date as much as possible. Email us at: linda@cpasf.org

WHY #BLACKLIVESMATTER?

STATEMENTS

ARTICLES

REFLECTIONS

TUMBLRs/Facebook/Storify Pages

INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY

RESOURCES ON ALLYSHIP

Photo Credit: “Your Asian Wasn’t Quiet